If you need to know about batteries; you’ve come to the right place Chinese flag 点击这里访问我们的中文网站 Chinese flag

batteries

A flaming embarrassment

Thu, 11/09/2017 - 11:59 -- Gerry Woolf

Looking for ways to make lithium-ion batteries safer? Well, don’t go to a battery safety conference, because you won’t learn much! At least I didn’t when I went to Cambridge EnerTech’s battery safety event last week in Arlington.

There’s a lot of interesting science around in terms of working out what happens when you short circuit a lithium-ion battery on a very expensive high energy X-ray source (the images are fantastic) but how that helps you, the manufacturer, prevent whatever that “natural” causative agent might be for this to happen seems about as likely as predicting the next self-styled lunatic with enough money (and guns) to carry out a massacre in the USA. 

It can’t be done.

As the Donald said: “This is not a guns issue.” And as to battery fires and failures, perhaps they are not a lithium-ion issue. If we didn’t have so many portable devices and electric vehicles, this would not be an issue at all… Of course, you’d have to plug your not-so-smart phone into a wall socket each time you wanted to check your mail and we’d all be connected ‘wiredly’ to do so much that we now take for granted. Or fire granted?

And this brings me to my final topic for this excuse for conference spleen venting… battery stand-up comedy!

It’s a new comedy form that is being developed by Joseph Nowikowski, almost the last act on the two-day event. Nowikowski, a fire investigator, managed to achieve laughs from fire scenes— before and after. Radio-controlled cars bursting into flames, caught on camera (security) in ‘man caves' all over the Union, dog teeth marks on a punctured battery found under a burned out sofa (we kid you not), not to mention the litany of stories of exploding vaping devices (missing teeth thrown in for more good measure) and laptops left charging on beds. All down to lithium-ion.

Nowikowski was right on the money. Sure, the insurance companies will pay out on the fire because they allow for peoples’ stupidity… but if they can show a defective battery was to blame, they’ll be after you. Another investigator in the audience said they had 120 open files on fires, with lithium batteries ‘in the firing line’, so to speak.

Nowikowski didn’t quite say, “if you can charge it, don’t leave it unattended”, but if I had felt like misrepresenting him, I could have sold that story to the so-called British newspaper, The Sun.

Joe public has no idea about the number of fake phone chargers there are in circulation, nor can they tell if a product has a BMS capable of detecting overcharge or thermal runaway in its earliest phase. They have no knowledge of UL and Interek’s safety standards and they like to buy cheap and nasty electronic products (‘cos they’re cheap!).

One day, the catalogue of errors that are ‘crap cells’ with flammable electrolytes will turn into the perfect storm and somewhere, perhaps, a lot of people will die, just like they did in London (thanks to flammable building materials) this summer. For other chemistries, it’s the equivalent of Weinstein’s alleged sex misdemeanours.

Isn’t it time you guys named and shamed?

 

Exide expands production in Missouri

Tue, 10/31/2017 - 09:36 -- Xuan Zhong
Exide expands production in Missouri

Lead-acid firm Exide Technologies is investing more than $35 million in a punched grid-manufacturing site in the US state of Missouri.

The US firm said the 180,000 sq ft facility in Kansas City will be “the most advanced of its kind”— with a production capacity of more than three billion grids each year.

 

The full story is only available in our FREE weekly industry newsletter, so sign-up to get it delivered to your inbox every Monday.

China names new base for Nissan batteries

Thu, 10/26/2017 - 10:39 -- Xuan Zhong
China names new base for Nissan batteries

Zhenjiang in China is to be the new headquarters and production base for the now Chinese-owned Nissan electric vehicles batteries business, state media has reported.

The new Nissan batteries complex will be set up in the Zhenjiang New District in Jiangsu Province at a cost of around CNY12.5 billion ($1.9bn), according to China’s Xinhua News Agency.

 

The full story is only available in our FREE weekly industry newsletter, so sign-up to get it delivered to your inbox every Monday.

India’s Amara Raja ‘eyes expansion into Li-on’

Tue, 10/17/2017 - 09:33 -- News Editor
India’s Amara Raja ‘eyes expansion into Li-on’

Indian lead-acid battery maker Amara Raja Batteries is reportedly preparing to branch out into “alternative chemistries” as part of business expansion plans.

Amara chairman Ramachandra N Galla told India’s Business Standard: “We expect to finalise the technologies and the investment plans in a year or two. The work on research, capital costs and partnerships is currently under way.”

 

The full story is only available in our FREE weekly industry newsletter, so sign-up to get it delivered to your inbox every Monday.

‘EU needs Airbus-style consortium’ for batteries

Tue, 09/26/2017 - 09:51 -- News Editor
‘EU needs Airbus-style consortium’ for batteries

The EU’s energy chief has called for the creation of a Europe-wide consortium to support the battery industry— to prevent the EU “falling behind” in the race with China and other nations to power electric vehicles (EVs).

Maroš Šefčovič (pictured), the European Commission vice-president responsible for the ‘EU energy union’, said the bloc should invest in an “Airbus for batteries”— a consortium that he said could do for batteries what the European multinational does for the aircraft industry.

 

The full story is only available in our FREE weekly industry newsletter, so sign-up to get it delivered to your inbox every Monday.

EU to future proof Batteries Directive

Tue, 09/26/2017 - 09:41 -- News Editor
EU to future proof Batteries Directive

The European Commission (EC) has launched a public consultation into the EU’s Batteries Directive, as part of a fundamental review of laws governing batteries in Europe.

Current legislation, which came into force in 2006, is based on data and the market situation that existed around the turn of the millennium— before lithium-ion technology had fully come into widespread use.

 

The full story is only available in our FREE weekly industry newsletter, so sign-up to get it delivered to your inbox every Monday.

Study points way to ‘safer batteries’

Fri, 09/15/2017 - 11:11 -- News Editor
Study points way to ‘safer batteries’

Researchers in Japan say they have identified new solid materials that could lead to the production of “potentially-safer” lithium-ion batteries.

According to a study published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials, research led by Makoto Moriya, of Shizuoka University’s Department of Chemistry, has identified solid crystals that “self-assemble” to form channels for an electric current that could lead to the manufacture of safer batteries.

 

The full story is only available in our FREE weekly industry newsletter, so sign-up to get it delivered to your inbox every Monday.

Kodak unveils NY battery tech centre

Thu, 09/14/2017 - 09:49 -- News Editor
Kodak unveils NY battery tech centre

Kodak has teamed up with the New York Battery and Energy Storage Technology Consortium (NY-BEST) to open a $5.9 million batteries and energy storage development facility in New York.

The move follows Kodak’s foray into battery technologin a bid to reinvent itself after the former global photographic film company’s bankruptcy in 2012.

 

The full story is only available in our FREE weekly industry newsletter, so sign-up to get it delivered to your inbox every Monday.

VW unveils $60bn batteries investment plan

Tue, 09/12/2017 - 11:41 -- News Editor
VW unveils $60bn batteries investment plan

Volkswagen has announced plans to invest more than EUR50 billion ($60bn) in battery cells and related technology, towards the electrification of its entire model portfolio by 2030 "at the latest".

CEO Matthias Mueller (pictured) said the group has already launched a global tender process to find manufacturing partners in China, Europe and North America— as VW will “need more than 150GWh of lithium-ion battery capacity annually by 2025 for its own e-fleet alone”.

Full report in the next edition of BEST Battery Briefing, out on 18 September. Subscribe now to receive your FREE copy by e-mail.

 

The full story is only available in our FREE weekly industry newsletter, so sign-up to get it delivered to your inbox every Monday.

China’s Camel to join Nissan battery buyout deal

Mon, 09/11/2017 - 11:38 -- Xuan Zhong
China’s Camel to join Nissan battery buyout deal

Camel Group has become the latest Chinese battery maker set to invest in the takeover of Nissan’s battery business led by private equity firm GSR Capital Advisors.

The announcement came after Zhejiang Unifull Industrial Fibre said it too would invest as a partner in the buyout deal.

 

The full story is only available in our FREE weekly industry newsletter, so sign-up to get it delivered to your inbox every Monday.

Pages

Subscribe to batteries