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lithium

India plans lithium subsidies to compete with lead-acid batteries

Thu, 02/26/2015 - 16:45 -- Paul Crompton
India plans lithium subsidies to compete with lead-acid batteries

The Indian government is planning a subsidy of Rs 32,000 (US$514) on all lithium battery kits to promote electric bike use and cut down vehicular pollution, reports The Indian Express.

The move will allow lithium-ion electric bike OEMs to compete with traditional lead-acid battery powered bikes, which are around US$400 cheaper. 

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Nemaska $12m grant for 500 tonne lithium plant

Fri, 02/20/2015 - 14:51 -- Paul Crompton
Guy Bourassa President and CEO of Nemaska Lithium

Canadian company Nemaska Lithium Inc has secured a $12.87million technology commercialisation grant to produce compounds for the lithium battery market.

The grant will help fund a Lithium hydroxide hydromet processing plant in Quebec with the aim of producing lithium compounds by 2016.

The $39million pilot plant will transform spodumene concentrate into 500 tonnes of high purity lithium hydroxide and lithium carbonate each year.

The funding came from the federally-funded Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) as the country attempts to position itself as a global leader in the clean technology sector.

The multi-million dollar grant to the Quebec based company was the largest ever awarded under the SDTC program.

Once built, Nemaska intends to use the facility to demonstrate its proprietary lithium hydroxide technology and produce commercial samples to send to end users in the lithium battery market.

In tandem, the Corporation is developing a spodumene lithium hard rock deposit. Spodumene concentrate produced at Nemaska's Whabouchi mine and from other global sources will be shipped to the Corporation's new plant.

The open-pit mine and concentrator, along with a refinery near Montreal, have a total capital cost of $500million and an annual capacity of 28,000 tonnes of lithium hydroxide and 3,000 tonnes of lithium carbonate.

Guy Bourassa President and CEO of Nemaska Lithium said: "Today's batteries are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and battery manufacturers typically take up to 12 months to qualify a new supplier of lithium hydroxide.

"By building the Phase 1 Plant in advance of the commercial hydromet plant and lithium mine we expect to be qualified suppliers before we are in full production."

He added: “This is the greenest method of producing lithium compounds for lithium ion batteries and electric vehicles globally.”

Nemaska intends to become a lithium hydroxide and lithium carbonate producer and has filed patent applications for its proprietary methods to produce these compounds. 

Saft’s Li-ion batteries excel in space mission

Thu, 02/05/2015 - 16:23 -- Paul Crompton
Saft’s Li-ion batteries excels in space mission

Lithium batteries developed by French firm Saft have been instrumental in a moon probe being able to beam information from space four times longer than its original design specification.

A combination of primary and rechargeable lithium batteries developed by the battery design and manufacturing company enabled LuxSpace’s Manfred Moon Memorial Mission (4M) mini-probe to transmit data back to earth.

A battery pack comprising 28 Saft super robust LSH20 HTS 3.6V Primary lithium-thionyl chloride (Li-SOCl2) size D spiral cells delivered 4.5W of power to the 4M probe - the first privately funded moon mission. 

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NTSB: Final Dreamliner battery fire report “within weeks”

Fri, 11/14/2014 - 03:35 -- Editor
Robert Swaim, NTSB

The US National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will publish "within two or three weeks" its final report on the 2013 lithium-ion battery fire aboard a Boeing 787 at Boston airport, according to one of its investigators.

The investigation began after the auxiliary power unit battery caught fire on a Japan Airlines Boeing 787 Dreamliner at Boston Logan International Airport on 7 January 2013. Regulators grounded the global fleet of Dreamliners for almost four months after a second battery incident days later on an All Nippon Airways flight in Japan prompted an emergency landing and evacuation.

 

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Dreamweaver introduces nanofibre separators line for supercaps

Thu, 10/30/2014 - 09:35 -- Laura Varriale
Dreamweaver separators

Lithium separator maker Dreamweaver International (Dreamweaver) has launched a line of nanofibre-based separators for supercapacitors.

According to the US company, the separators of the Silver AR line show 27% lower internal resistance. In side-by-side comparisons done by outside laboratories comparing Dreamweaver’s Silver AR line to a competitor, the separators also showed 63% lower Gurley resistance, 21% higher strength and 9% higher capacitance.

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Airbus to bring back lithium-ion batteries on A350

Fri, 10/10/2014 - 11:04 -- Editor
Airbus 350

Airbus will bring back lithium-ion batteries to its A350-900 from 2016 after removing the more advanced power sources from early production jets following defects on models used in Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner.

The European aircraft manufacturer will switch back from nickel-cadmium batteries picked for the earlier planes. Airbus initially designed the A350 to use advanced lithium batteries, which are lighter than nickel-cadmium.

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International air safety officials consider limiting number of lithium batteries on planes

Mon, 09/15/2014 - 12:43 -- Editor
International air safety officials consider limiting number of lithium batteries on planes

The United Nations International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has discussed potential limits on the number of rechargeable, lithium-ion batteries carried by a single passenger aircraft, according to newspaper reports.

The discussions, which took place during an ICAO conference in Cologne on 9 September, involve bulk shipments of batteries, rather than batteries carried by individual travelers, reported the Wall Street Journal.

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Posco to open up lithium plant in Argentina

Wed, 08/13/2014 - 11:04 -- Laura Varriale
Posco plant in Chile

South Korean Posco is to build a lithium carbonate plant at the Cauchari salt lake in Argentina and to install its lithium extraction technology.

The lithium plant is set to start operations in December this year. The facility is aimed to have an annual production capacity of 200 tonnes.

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Albemarle to buy lithium producer Rockwood for $6.2 billion

Thu, 07/17/2014 - 10:32 -- Laura Varriale
Rockwwod lithium asset in Nevada

Chemical maker Albemarle is to pay $6.2 billion in stock and shares for lithium producer Rockwood to tap into the increasing demand for lithium.

Rockwood is one of the four big lithium producers that control about 90% of the lithium production market. The purchase of Rockwood will give Albemarle access to the company’s assets in the Atacama desert in Chile, providing a low-cost base for lithium production. Rockwood also has a site in Nevada, US.

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Bolivia’s first lithium-ion battery plant opens

Wed, 02/26/2014 - 17:08 -- Ruth Williams
The Uyuni Salt Flats hold up to 100m tonnes of lithium

Bolivia’s first lithium-ion battery manufacturing plant has opened in La Placa, a town near the Uyuni Salt Flat— the world’s largest lithium reserve.

The factory has been built by Chinese battery manufacturing company LinYi Dake from Shandong. A small team from LinYi Dake will oversee the plant that will employ 21 Bolivian operators.

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