If you need to know about batteries; you’ve come to the right place
Chinese flag点击这里访问我们的中文网站Chinese flag

batteries

Australia to make lithium-ion batteries within months

Tue, 06/22/2021 - 16:22 -- Paul Crompton
Australia to make lithium-ion batteries within months

The first Australia produced batteries are due to roll off the production line within weeks as Energy Renaissance moves closer to its goal of a domestic lithium-ion gigafactory.

The company aims to make its first cells at the interim plant in Tomago, New South Wales, by August.

The company is manufacturing its superRack energy storage systems using a combination of Australian and imported materials, but aims to be making batteries using 100% domestically sourced materials from 2024.

The 4,000 square-meter purpose-built, 36MWh per year lithium-ion manufacturing plant in Tomago cost of AUS$28 million ($20 million).

The company expects to transition to its 1GWh purpose-built battery manufacturing facility— Renaissance One— by February 2022 with the aim of growing capacity to 5.3GWh. 

Renaissance One will have an initially capacity of 200MWh per year when it is commissioned next February, with plans to ramp up to 800MWh per year depending on the final level of automation.

A company spokesman told BEST: “We secured the lease for a temporary facility in Tomago, NSW, to allow us to commence production of batteries by August.

“This means we will have Australian batteries available sooner than we had originally planned last October.

“We have commenced planning for the manufacturing of battery cells at a dedicated facility called Renaissance Two that will supply cells to the Renaissance One battery manufacturing facility. 

“At this stage, we are currently in the preliminary planning stages and we hope that Renaissance Two will commence operations in mid-2023.”

Last year the company secured AUS$246,625 ($175,000) co-funded grant to push forward plans for its Renaissance One plant, which will manufacture batteries for Australia and export to Southeast Asia.

 
Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

JV aims to build Italian lithium-ion gigafactory for motive and stationary application markets

Fri, 06/18/2021 - 12:31 -- Paul Crompton
JV aims to build Italian lithium-ion gigafactory for motive and stationary application markets

A joint venture (JV) aims to produce lithium-ion batteries in Italy with the end goal of reaching a production capacity of more than 2GWh within five years.

Electric propulsion maker Fincantieri SI and energy storage system developer Faist Electronics have formed the JV Power4Future company to build a manufacturing facility, followed by the design, assembly, marketing and after-sales services for modules and battery packs.

Plans also include control devices such as battery management systems (BMS) and ancillary systems (such as fire protection and air conditioning for complete battery stationary systems).

Power4Future will target a number of markets, including: automotive (with particular reference to commercial vehicles), telecommunication and industrial (i.e. material handling machines).

The JV will also target marine and land-based energy storage applications where Faist Electronics and Fincantieri SI are already established.

Gianfranco Natali, president and founder of Faist Group, said: “In a green energy setting, lithium-ion batteries and energy storage systems will be the new fuel tank for the maritime and land mobility of the future.”

Giuseppe Bono, CEO of Fincantieri, said: “Future environmental protection regulations will drive ship owners to adopt new alternative solutions to those currently based on internal combustion engines, in order to produce and use energy. 

“Faced with the need for greater storage capacity, lithium-ion batteries today are the only solution that is both technically and economically sustainable for full electric vessels, which currently makes them one of the most important assets not only for the naval industry, but also for all the other sectors where we will be able to operate with this new company.”

Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

Grant centralises lead-acid battery case recycling

Fri, 06/18/2021 - 12:17 -- Paul Crompton

KC Recycling is set to create a facility for recycling the plastic cases from lead-acid batteries following a ($852,000) grant.

The cash from CleanBC Plastics Action Fund will jumpstart a CAD$1.2 million ($991,000) plant upgrade that will include a Polypropylene Extruding Operation at the Trail, British Columbia, plant in Canada.

Previously the plant exported its unfinished plastic regrind to polypropylene compounders, where it was pelletised to meet manufacturers' requirements. 

The new plant will be able to do this with an on-site washing, extrusion, and pelletising laboratory. 

KC Recycling will test the refined material to ensure it meets customer specifications before shipping it to battery manufacturers for use in new batteries.

Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

MG Motor and Attero partner for responsible recycling of EV batteries in India

Fri, 06/11/2021 - 11:49 -- Paul Crompton
MG Motor and Attero partner for responsible recycling of EV batteries in India

MG Motor India has partnered with urban mining firm Attero to develop ways of reusing and recycling end-of-life lithium-ion batteries from electric vehicles in India. 

MG Motor India—the Indian arm of the UK-based vehicle maker— has made the deal in line with India’s vision of creating an end-to-end electric vehicle ecosystem in the country.

The move aims to assist in the responsible recycling, and minimise the carbon footprint, of EV users. 

Nitin Gupta, Attero’s chief executive officer, said: “We believe in sustainable approaches as we are committed to the ‘Clean India, Green India’ vision.”

Attero holds more than 30 global patents for its recycling technologies. 

Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

Sodium-ion trends as CATL announces plans to diversify into the technology

Fri, 06/11/2021 - 11:46 -- Paul Crompton
Sodium-ion trends as CATL announces plans to diversify into the technology

UK battery maker Faradion has welcomed an announcement that lithium-ion battery giant Contemporary Amperex Technology (CATL) will begin making sodium-ion batteries from next month.

Faradion, which also makes sodium-ion batteries, said the decision underscores the importance of the technology as an integral part of a world beyond lithium.

Robin Zeng, the founder of Tesla's battery supplier CATL, reportedly made the announcement at a shareholder meeting.

A Faradion statement read: “This is a necessary transition: lithium-ion batteries used predominantly in EVs contain lithium, cobalt and copper, and in stationary energy storage lithium and copper. These are expensive raw materials and their mining leads to adverse environmental impacts. Lithium has also become constrained due to restricted availability and increased prices.

Faradion’s proprietary technology boasts performance of 150-160Wh/kg. 

In May, UK institute The Faraday Institution released its report ‘Sodium-ion Batteries: Inexpensive and Sustainable Energy Storage’.

The report outlined sodium-ion batteries promising cost, safety, sustainability and performance advantages over commercialised lithium-ion batteries. 

Key advantages include the use of widely available and inexpensive raw materials and a rapidly scalable technology based around existing lithium-ion production methods. 

Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

LG Chem extends ESS recall after concerns with over-heating lithium-ion batteries

Tue, 06/08/2021 - 10:56 -- Paul Crompton
LG Energy Solution— an LG Chem subsidiary— will extend its scheme to replace lithium-ion batteries used in its home energy storage systems (ESS) to include all geographical markets.

LG Energy Solution— an LG Chem subsidiary— will extend its scheme to replace lithium-ion batteries used in its home energy storage systems (ESS) to include all geographical markets.

ESSs manufactured between April 2017 and September 2018 are being recalled due to overheating concerns.

The latest scheme expands on similar programs in Australia and the US.

The Korean firm— launched last December by LG Chem— will replace batteries with others that “incorporate manufacturing process improvements that further enhance the safety of its ESS batteries” for free.

All proposed safety measures, including the replacement of the potentially affected ESS batteries, will take place after consultation with customers.

LG Energy Solution will implement remote modifications to the affected batteries, where possible, to reduce the potential for overheating while owners of the affected ESS units wait for their replacement units.

In addition, the firm will update its battery diagnostic and control software. 

Earlier this year, the Korean battery giant made a safety recall over concerns its Resu-branded residential ESSs installed in Australia could overheat and catch on fire.

These concerns came just months after a similar recall in the US, with the company working with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) following reports of five fires with its battery systems.

The latest recall in the UK involves LG Chem’s RESU 10H lithium-ion storage battery that have been installed as part of a residential energy solar panel system.

The serial number of the recalled product begins with R15563P3SSEG and is located behind the access door of the RESU 10H (Type-R) home battery.

A newswire statement from LG Chem read: “LG Energy Solution conducted a review of its manufacturing and quality assurance processes in relation to reported incidents that occurred due to the overheating of the batteries subject to this program. 

“Based on its review, LG Energy Solution has determined that there were certain issues in the early production processes for electrodes used in these potentially affected ESS batteries. “ 

Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

UK scientists drive progress on lithium-air batteries

Thu, 06/03/2021 - 13:51 -- Paul Crompton
UK scientists drive progress on lithium-air batteries

Researchers in the UK are making progress in the development of stable and practical electrolytes for lithium-oxygen batteries.

Scientists have characterised and developed electrolyte formulations that minimise side reactions within the lithium-oxygen (lithium-air) battery to enable improved longer cycle stability.

Work was led by the University of Liverpool’s Stephenson Institute for Renewable Energy (SIRE) in partnership with Johnson Matthey, and Loughborough University.

The technology is in its infancy, but in theory could provide much greater energy storage than the conventional lithium-ion battery, say the team.

The research was published in the journal Advanced Functional Materials.

Lead author of the paper, Dr Alex Neale from SIRE, said the research demonstrated the reactivity of certain electrolyte components can be switched off by precise control of component ratios.

Dr Neale said: “The ability to precisely formulate the electrolyte using readily-available, low volatility components enabled us to specially tailor an electrolyte for the needs of metal-air battery technology that delivered greatly improved cycle stability and functionality.

“The outcomes from our study really show that by understanding the precise coordination environment of the lithium ion within our electrolytes, we can link this directly to achieving significant gains in electrolyte stability at the Li metal electrode interface and, consequently, enhancements in actual cell performance.”

The electrolytes provide new benchmark formulations to support ongoing investigations to understand and develop new, and practically viable, cathode architectures to reduce round-trip inefficiencies and further extend cycle lifetimes. 

The collaborative study was made possible by support from an Innovate UK grant.

Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

Exide increases the ‘green’ credentials of its lead batteries even further

Fri, 05/28/2021 - 10:31 -- Paul Crompton
Exide increases the ‘green’ credentials of its lead batteries even further

Exide Technologies has updated its range of after market lead-acid batteries with a focus on using recycled plastic for its boxes and lids to reduce their environmental impact.

The France headquartered firm’s design uses recycled plastic instead of virgin polipropylene (PP) for its a spill and spark-proof security lid.

The new design will be introduced to all of Exide Technologies’ top-of-the-line conventional batteries, with its Exide Premium also using its proprietary Carbon Boost 2.0 technology that uses carbon additives on the negative plates.

The new batteries can be manufactured on existing production lines, with the new design of boxes and lids not requiring any special upgrades of the production lines besides ordinary adjustments.

In its purchasing contract, Exide specifies the boxes and lids bought from outside suppliers are made of recycled plastic instead of virgin PP. 

Guido Scanagatta, senior product manager EMEA at Exide Technologies, told BEST: “We have a material and manufacturing process validation system that is specific to RPP (Reprocessed Polipropylene), which covers several checks on material (dimensions and performance) and adjustment of some parameters in the assembly line (lid to box and secondary lid to main lid thermo welding process mostly).

“Generally, the boxes and the lids are made with injection molding process using either molten virgin or reprocessed PP. The same mold can normally use both materials.”

Exide says the change will lead to savings each manufacturing year of: 2,700 tons of CO2, 8 million litres of water and 1.2 million litres of crude oil.

Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

California’s DTSC removes lead-acid batteries from its toxic watch list

Wed, 05/19/2021 - 08:14 -- Paul Crompton
oger Miksad, executive vice president of BCI,

Lead-acid batteries have been removed from a list of priority products and chemicals under review for potential regulation in the US.

The California's Department of Toxic Substances Control’s (DTSC) ‘2021-23 Priority Product Work Plan’ document omits the batteries for the first time since 2018.

The plan is released every three years under the organisation’s Safer Consumer Products Program (SCPP).

A technical document summarising the information DTSC’s relied on to make its decision is due to be published later this year.

The Battery Council International (BCI) welcomed the news.

A BCI statement said the DTSC’s decision to refrain from listing lead batteries as a “Priority Product” in the SCPP sent an important signal to the energy marketplace.

The organisation hopes the decision will encourage continued investment in lead batteries. 

Roger Miksad, executive vice president of BCI, said: “This outcome is the right one and recognises that lead batteries are critical to meeting America’s energy storage needs and are already well-regulated. 

“The industry’s highly successful closed-loop recycling system and investment in new technologies and innovations also means that lead batteries hold the promise of delivering safe, sustainable energy storage in the future.” 

The agency's decision reflects an evaluation of potential life cycle impacts, current regulations and ongoing product innovation in the lead battery industry.

Lead batteries were placed on the 2018-2020 Priority Product Work Plan, in part, because of lead contamination concerns surrounding the closed Exide battery recycling facility in California.

The report noted: “Based on the findings of our work, we concluded that listing lead-acid batteries as a priority product is not likely to further enhance protection to human health, given that billions of dollars are already being invested worldwide in researching new, safer battery technologies.” 

The SCPP Program will hold a public workshop on lead-acid batteries this summer. 

DTSC will provide short summaries of the ongoing work of the Lead-Acid Battery Recycling Facility Investigation and Cleanup (LABRIC) Program and the Lithium-Ion Car Battery Recycling Advisory Group as context for its decision. 

A BCI statement read: “Lead batteries are a proven technology powering motor vehicles, cargo handling equipment, medical devices, telecommunications infrastructure, microgrids and many other applications across California in a safe, reliable, cost effective and sustainable manner. 

“Ongoing improvements in design and performance position lead batteries as a cornerstone energy storage technology to enable greater utilization of renewable energy resources and 24/7 reliability for residential properties and commercial buildings.”

Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

India’s second biggest lead-acid battery maker has manufacturing suspension lifted

Mon, 05/17/2021 - 08:45 -- Paul Crompton
India’s second biggest lead-acid battery maker has manufacturing suspension lifted

Indian firm Amara Raja Batteries has restarted the manufacturing of lead-acid batteries following the closure of two of its plants last month.

The company resumed operations at its Nunegundlapalli and Karkambadi plants on 8 May after the High Court of Andhra Pradesh granted an interim suspension of the orders passed by Andhra Pradesh Pollution Control Board (APPCB), according to India newspaper The Financial Times.

Amara received closure orders for the company's plants in Andhra Pradesh state on 30 April from APPCB.

The closure order was for allegedly violating the Water (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Act, 1974 and Air (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Act, 1981, reported Indian newspapersThe Hindu.

The Hindu reported “The company has been charged with polluting ambient air, which resulted in the presence of high levels of lead in the blood of its employees and people of surrounding villages, discharging untreated wastewater into drains and untreated sewage into stormwater drains and causing soil contamination”.

In a statement, Amara Raja said it had taken proactive measures to ensure its obligations to supply products and services were met without causing any inconvenience; it was assessing the impact of the short-term disruption.

The Financial Times quoted an Amara Raja statement that read: “Continuing with its focus on the best-in-class systems and processes for environmental, safety and health practices, the company will continue to engage closely with APPCB to resolve any potential issues,.” Amara Raja Batteries noted: “We have taken proactive measures to ensure that all our obligations to supply products and services to our customers are met in a timely manner without causing any inconvenience, whatsoever.”

Amara did not reply to BEST’s questions.

Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

Pages

Subscribe to batteries