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IBM

LG Chem, Ford in blockchain pilot to trace ‘ethical’ battery materials

Mon, 01/21/2019 - 00:00 -- John Shepherd

Tech giant IBM has teamed up with battery maker LG Chem, the Ford Motor Company and others to use blockchain technology “to trace and validate ethically-sourced materials” for batteries and other products.

The group, which includes Chinese mining firm Zhejiang Huayou Cobalt and auditing specialist RCS Global, is starting with a pilot focused on cobalt sourced in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

The move comes amid increasing pressure on electric vehicle producers and their battery suppliers to ensure an ethical approach for procuring raw materials— and hot on the heels of another ‘sustainable cobalt’ initiative launched by South Korea’s Samsung SDI and Samsung Electronics, Germany’s BMW and chemicals group BASF.

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Blockchain tech trialled in international projects

Wed, 05/17/2017 - 09:37 -- Xuan Zhong
Blockchain tech trialled in international projects

Dutch electricity transmission system operator (TSO) TenneT is working with German battery storage firm Sonnen, Amsterdam-based energy company Vandebron and IBM to launch pilot projects integrating storage batteries into the power supply system via blockchain technology.

Blockchain, a platform developed by IBM, ensures the verifiability and transparency of the transactions of the small-scale batteries. It is expected to simplify how suppliers of locally distributed flexible energy provide services to support power grid operators in the future. 

 

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IBM and JCESR step back from lithium-air research

Tue, 06/03/2014 - 12:17 -- Laura Varriale
IBM Battery 500

US labs IBM and Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR) have downgraded their research on lithium-air technology.

Lithium-air is widely seen as the 'holy grail', not least for for EV batteries. Using the oxidation of lithium at the andoe and the reduction of oxygen at the cathode to induce a current, lithium-air - if ever made to work cost-effectively over sufficient cycles - could lead to batteries with a range of 500 miles drives on a single charge - up to five times more than the average pure EV.

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