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BASF’s cathode expansion accelerates with German lithium-ion recycling plant

Thu, 07/15/2021 - 14:44 -- paul Crompton
BASF flags

Chemicals giant BASF is set to build a battery recycling prototype plant in Germany to extract key materials from end-of-life lithium-ion cells and production scrap.

The plant at BASF’s cathode active materials (CAM) plant site in Schwarzheide is scheduled to be commissioned by 2023.

The prototype plant will allow for the “development of operational procedures and optimisation” of technology to recover lithium, nickel, cobalt and manganese from used batteries as well as off spec material from cell producers and battery material producers.

The recovered metals will be used to manufacturer cathode active materials.

Dr. Matthias Dohrn, senior vice president, precious and base metal services at BASF, said: “With this battery recycling, plus leading process technology for manufacturing of cathode active materials, we aim to ‘close the loop’ while reducing the CO2 footprint of our cathode active materials by up to 60% in total compared to industry standards.”

The plant’s location was announced in February.

Aggressive cathode expansion

In June, BASF is set to form a joint venture (JV) with Hunan Shanshan Energy to produce lithium-ion battery cathode active materials (CAM) and precursors (PCAM) in China.

German firm BASF will have a 51% share of the JV when it closes later this summer following the approval of the relevant authorities.

In May, materials firm Umicore and BASF entered into a non-exclusive patent cross-license agreement covering a range of lithium-ion cathode materials and their precursors.

 
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First New York lithium-ion cells made as consortium eyes 45GWh global capacity

Wed, 06/16/2021 - 12:14 -- paul Crompton

A consortium has made its first lithium-ion cells as it moves toward plans for a commercially viable 15GWh gigafactory in New York, US.

Imperium3 New York (iM3NY) has produced its first full sized prismatic cells for limited testing and customer sampling in Q3 of this year.

The first cells were produced using manual settings to refine the product design for future automated production. 

Imperium3 New York consortium consists of Magnis Energy, C4V LLC New York and Boston Energy and Innovation.

The consortium said the cells were the first stage of demonstration of its ability to synchronise material science, engineering and process knowledge to produce a commercially viable lithium-ion cell. 

A Magnis statement read: “While the volumes would increase with fully optimised and automated lines, the current phase works towards production grade design and de-risks design unknowns involved in the transition from pilot production to full scale production.”

The manufacturing plant will be located in the Huron Campus of Endicott, New York State, and will be the first of three global locations that Imperium3 will commence volume operations from. 

Plans also include a 15GWh lithium-ion battery manufacturing facility in Townsville, Australia. 

In all, the consortium aims to build three 15GWh battery manufacturing plants servicing global markets such as Australasia, North America and the Middle East.

Australia’s abundance of raw battery materials has led another firm to launch plans for a 1.3GWh factory.

Energy Renaissance secured AUS$246,625 ($175,000) co-funded grant last year to push forward plans for its Renaissance One plant, which will manufacture batteries for Australia and export to Southeast Asia.

 
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VW breaks ground on Lab to develop and test US focused lithium-ion EV batteries

Mon, 11/16/2020 - 15:10 -- paul Crompton

Vehicle OEM Volkswagen of America, a subsidiary of Volkswagen Group, has begun building its first lithium-ion battery testing facility outside of Europe or Asia to ensure “better tuned” cells for the US electric vehicle market.

The $22 million Battery Engineering Lab at its Chattanooga Engineering and Planning Center in the US state of Tennessee will test and validate electric vehicle cells and battery packs for the North American market.

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LFP tests indicate lithium-ion cells can be made from waste material and recycled batteries

Tue, 08/18/2020 - 09:48 -- paul Crompton

Battery materials firm Lithium Australia has completed initial tests on its lithium ferro phosphate (LFP) battery cells made from waste material, including low-grade spodumene and spent lithium-ion batteries.

The Australian firm has said testing revealed the 2032 cells, with a lithium metal negative electrode, achieved capacities of up to 161mAh/g at a 0.1C discharge rate1. 

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German project aims to boost EV lithium-ion battery size and manufacturing abilities

Tue, 03/24/2020 - 12:12 -- paul Crompton

Researchers at the Center for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research Baden-Württemberg (ZSW) in Germany to bridge the gap from prototype demonstration to industrial mass production of large-format lithium-ion cells.

Launched earlier this month, the ZellkoBatt project will look at reducing the costs of components and digitising manufacturing processes for cells to be used in automotive applications.

The research will include large-format pouch and PHEV-2 cells up to 80Ah and 21700 cylindrical cells.

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Bisolar sends its silicon anode based lithium-ion batteries for commercial viability testing

Fri, 03/20/2020 - 12:24 -- paul Crompton

Prototype 21700 lithium-ion cells incorporating silicon anodes will be made available for third party analysis after battery developer Bisolar completed initial testing of its second batch of commercial-grade cells.

The California, US, company is making the prototypes available to potential development partners for their in-house qualification and analysis, which will be used to develop its battery technology for electric vehicles.

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US firm begins tests on silicon anodes in bid to develop next-gen lithium-ion batteries for

Wed, 01/29/2020 - 15:18 -- paul Crompton

Testing has begun on battery additive firm BioSolar’s second batch of commercial-grade prototype 21700 lithium-ion cells that use silicon anodes.

The US firm announced on 14 January that its technology partner had begun production and testing of the new cells that incorporate “additional cell design work”.

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SK Innovation to target EV market with cells from its first ‘overseas’ lithium-ion gigafactory

Thu, 12/12/2019 - 13:43 -- paul Crompton

South Korea’s battery maker SK Innovation will begin mass production of lithium-ion battery cells for electric vehicles at its new plant dubbed BEST early next year.

Operations at the 168,000 square meter plant in Changzhou, Jiangsu Province, China, will begin after test operation and product approvals, following completion of the battery line.

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‘Rogue shippers’ risk to lithium air cargo safety

Wed, 03/13/2019 - 11:42 -- John Shepherd
‘Rogue shippers’ risk to lithium air cargo safety

Lithium batteries pose risks for air cargo safety because of “rogue shippers” and a failure to enforce regulations, the head of the trade body for the world’s airlines has warned.

Alexandre de Juniac (right), director-general and CEO of the International Air Transport Association (IATA), said the batteries “can be shipped safely if properly labelled and packaged”.

But de Juniac said: “With respect to the safety of air cargo, transport of lithium batteries is the most topical issue.”

 
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Sensor breakthrough may reduce EV lithium-ion pack prices

Thu, 02/02/2017 - 15:00 -- paul Crompton
Sensor breakthrough may reduce EV lithium-ion pack prices

With thousands of cells in a typical electric vehicle battery pack, reducing the use of individual parts would be a game changer for the industry.

Researchers at a German University may have done just that with a sensor system that could reduce cost and increase the energy density of lithium-ion batteries.

The system currently exists as a laboratory prototype.

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