If you need to know about batteries; you’ve come to the right place
Chinese flag点击这里访问我们的中文网站Chinese flag

lead-acid

Showa Denko to sell lead-battery business interests for $540m

Fri, 07/16/2021 - 09:55 -- Paul Crompton
Showa Denko headquarters

Battery maker Showa Denko is set to sell its underperforming lead-acid operations for a reported 60 billion yen ($540 million). 

The Japanese firm sold its interests in the lead-acid battery market to investment firm Sustainable Battery Solutions, which is operated by Sustainable Battery Holdings (whose largest shareholders are the investment fund Advantage Partners and financial services company Tokyo Century), according to news outlet Nikkei Asia.

Lead battery firms CSB Energy Technology and Thai Energy Storage Technology Public Company are part of a wider company split and incorporation of a new operating company called Energy Storage Devices Spin-Off Preparation.

The transaction will be concluded on the condition that SBS obtains the clearances and licenses necessary under the domestic and international competition laws and other laws and regulations. 

Showa Denko Materials, the consolidated subsidiary of Showa Denko, shall be the splitting company and new company will be the successor company when the split happens this December.

The moves comes as Showa Denko announced it will record an extraordinary loss of about 30 billion yen ($270 million) for the first half of the year. 

 
Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

Hybrid lead-acid and lithium-ion ESS to power GS Yuasa’s UK battery plant

Thu, 07/01/2021 - 11:00 -- Paul Crompton
ADEPT Hybrid lead-acid and lithium-ion ESS to power GS Yuasa’s UK battery plant

Renewable power developer Infinite has launched a project that combines wind turbines and solar photovoltaic with a hybrid lead-acid and lithium energy storage system.

The project began with the installation of a 1MWh rooftop solar system at Japanese-headquartered GS Yuasa’s factory in south Wales where the lead-acid battery is made. 

An assembly line is due to be installed at the Welsh manufacturing site to produce lithium-ion battery modules.

The Energy Centre project will link renewables with GS Yuasa’s ADEPT ESS that was developed alongside the University of Sheffield and Innovate UK.

GS Yuasa’s ADEPT ESS that was developed alongside the University of Sheffield and Innovate.

Shaun Gardner, managing director, GS Yuasa Manufacturing UK, said the unique combination of lithium and lead-acid batteries allowed for the storage of energy generated by either solar or wind to be used at a later date.

Last August, GS Yuasa delivered a 100kW hybrid system to Portsmouth International Port as part of the Port Energy Systems Optimisation (PESO) project. 

The battery system will be used to charge electric cars and peak shifting services as the port demonstrates how it can operate as a smart energy network.

GS Yuasa has received 2.5 million ($3.4 million) in funding from the Welsh Government to help it increase production of its batteries, which include valve regulated lead-acid.

Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

Grant centralises lead-acid battery case recycling

Fri, 06/18/2021 - 12:17 -- Paul Crompton

KC Recycling is set to create a facility for recycling the plastic cases from lead-acid batteries following a ($852,000) grant.

The cash from CleanBC Plastics Action Fund will jumpstart a CAD$1.2 million ($991,000) plant upgrade that will include a Polypropylene Extruding Operation at the Trail, British Columbia, plant in Canada.

Previously the plant exported its unfinished plastic regrind to polypropylene compounders, where it was pelletised to meet manufacturers' requirements. 

The new plant will be able to do this with an on-site washing, extrusion, and pelletising laboratory. 

KC Recycling will test the refined material to ensure it meets customer specifications before shipping it to battery manufacturers for use in new batteries.

Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

Exide increases the ‘green’ credentials of its lead batteries even further

Fri, 05/28/2021 - 10:31 -- Paul Crompton
Exide increases the ‘green’ credentials of its lead batteries even further

Exide Technologies has updated its range of after market lead-acid batteries with a focus on using recycled plastic for its boxes and lids to reduce their environmental impact.

The France headquartered firm’s design uses recycled plastic instead of virgin polipropylene (PP) for its a spill and spark-proof security lid.

The new design will be introduced to all of Exide Technologies’ top-of-the-line conventional batteries, with its Exide Premium also using its proprietary Carbon Boost 2.0 technology that uses carbon additives on the negative plates.

The new batteries can be manufactured on existing production lines, with the new design of boxes and lids not requiring any special upgrades of the production lines besides ordinary adjustments.

In its purchasing contract, Exide specifies the boxes and lids bought from outside suppliers are made of recycled plastic instead of virgin PP. 

Guido Scanagatta, senior product manager EMEA at Exide Technologies, told BEST: “We have a material and manufacturing process validation system that is specific to RPP (Reprocessed Polipropylene), which covers several checks on material (dimensions and performance) and adjustment of some parameters in the assembly line (lid to box and secondary lid to main lid thermo welding process mostly).

“Generally, the boxes and the lids are made with injection molding process using either molten virgin or reprocessed PP. The same mold can normally use both materials.”

Exide says the change will lead to savings each manufacturing year of: 2,700 tons of CO2, 8 million litres of water and 1.2 million litres of crude oil.

Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

California’s DTSC removes lead-acid batteries from its toxic watch list

Wed, 05/19/2021 - 08:14 -- Paul Crompton
oger Miksad, executive vice president of BCI,

Lead-acid batteries have been removed from a list of priority products and chemicals under review for potential regulation in the US.

The California's Department of Toxic Substances Control’s (DTSC) ‘2021-23 Priority Product Work Plan’ document omits the batteries for the first time since 2018.

The plan is released every three years under the organisation’s Safer Consumer Products Program (SCPP).

A technical document summarising the information DTSC’s relied on to make its decision is due to be published later this year.

The Battery Council International (BCI) welcomed the news.

A BCI statement said the DTSC’s decision to refrain from listing lead batteries as a “Priority Product” in the SCPP sent an important signal to the energy marketplace.

The organisation hopes the decision will encourage continued investment in lead batteries. 

Roger Miksad, executive vice president of BCI, said: “This outcome is the right one and recognises that lead batteries are critical to meeting America’s energy storage needs and are already well-regulated. 

“The industry’s highly successful closed-loop recycling system and investment in new technologies and innovations also means that lead batteries hold the promise of delivering safe, sustainable energy storage in the future.” 

The agency's decision reflects an evaluation of potential life cycle impacts, current regulations and ongoing product innovation in the lead battery industry.

Lead batteries were placed on the 2018-2020 Priority Product Work Plan, in part, because of lead contamination concerns surrounding the closed Exide battery recycling facility in California.

The report noted: “Based on the findings of our work, we concluded that listing lead-acid batteries as a priority product is not likely to further enhance protection to human health, given that billions of dollars are already being invested worldwide in researching new, safer battery technologies.” 

The SCPP Program will hold a public workshop on lead-acid batteries this summer. 

DTSC will provide short summaries of the ongoing work of the Lead-Acid Battery Recycling Facility Investigation and Cleanup (LABRIC) Program and the Lithium-Ion Car Battery Recycling Advisory Group as context for its decision. 

A BCI statement read: “Lead batteries are a proven technology powering motor vehicles, cargo handling equipment, medical devices, telecommunications infrastructure, microgrids and many other applications across California in a safe, reliable, cost effective and sustainable manner. 

“Ongoing improvements in design and performance position lead batteries as a cornerstone energy storage technology to enable greater utilization of renewable energy resources and 24/7 reliability for residential properties and commercial buildings.”

Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

Leoch expands further into Europe with lead-acid battery distributer buy out

Tue, 05/18/2021 - 08:38 -- Paul Crompton
Leoch expands further into Europe with lead-acid battery distributer buy out

Chinese battery manufacturer Leoch has strengthened its grip on the European lead-acid market with the buyout of Spanish battery distributor Meibat.

The Chinese company will set up firm Leoch Iberia with the goal of establishing a permanent market hold in the Iberia region.  

Established in 1992, Meibat distributed industrial batteries in Spain from its base just outside of Madrid.

A new warehouse facility will be set up in Madrid to cover the network power and motive power markets throughout Spain and Portugal. 

Meibat has historically focused on complementary sectors to Leoch in telecommunications, UPS, data centres, renewables and energy storage as well the motive markets. 

The company is in the top 10 of battery and energy system distributors in Spain with all the major key accounts in the region.

Leoch now has direct operations in Spain, Greece, France, Germany, Italy and the UK. 

The company has 10 regional manufacturing plants in China, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, India and Vietnam.

Apostolos Tasiopoulos, Leoch's vice president for Europe, Middle East and Africa, said: “Leoch previously had a representative in Spain but this major acquisition will enable us to establish a permanent footprint with all original equipment customers in Iberia. 

“It was the only major European country on our target list where we didn’t have our own entity; it joins our existing facilities in France, Germany, Italy and the UK.”

Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

Battery maker GS Yuasa celebrates 40 years of lead-acid production in Wales

Tue, 05/18/2021 - 08:04 -- Paul Crompton
Battery maker GS Yuasa celebrates 40 years of lead-acid production in Wales

GS Yuasa Battery Manufacturing UK is celebrating 40 years of lead-acid battery making in South Wales.

Established in 1981, the company has produced more than 85 million batteries at their Ebbw Vale production facility.

More than 60% of sales are exported, mainly within Europe.

The first plant was a single, 4,700m² factory, but the site has since grown to more than 27,000m² as additional factories were built in 1987, 1988 and 1994. 

Initially established as Yuasa Battery UK, the company name changed to GS Yuasa Battery Manufacturing UK Ltd in 2017 as part of the global roll out of the parent company name from Japan. 

Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

India’s second biggest lead-acid battery maker has manufacturing suspension lifted

Mon, 05/17/2021 - 08:45 -- Paul Crompton
India’s second biggest lead-acid battery maker has manufacturing suspension lifted

Indian firm Amara Raja Batteries has restarted the manufacturing of lead-acid batteries following the closure of two of its plants last month.

The company resumed operations at its Nunegundlapalli and Karkambadi plants on 8 May after the High Court of Andhra Pradesh granted an interim suspension of the orders passed by Andhra Pradesh Pollution Control Board (APPCB), according to India newspaper The Financial Times.

Amara received closure orders for the company's plants in Andhra Pradesh state on 30 April from APPCB.

The closure order was for allegedly violating the Water (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Act, 1974 and Air (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Act, 1981, reported Indian newspapersThe Hindu.

The Hindu reported “The company has been charged with polluting ambient air, which resulted in the presence of high levels of lead in the blood of its employees and people of surrounding villages, discharging untreated wastewater into drains and untreated sewage into stormwater drains and causing soil contamination”.

In a statement, Amara Raja said it had taken proactive measures to ensure its obligations to supply products and services were met without causing any inconvenience; it was assessing the impact of the short-term disruption.

The Financial Times quoted an Amara Raja statement that read: “Continuing with its focus on the best-in-class systems and processes for environmental, safety and health practices, the company will continue to engage closely with APPCB to resolve any potential issues,.” Amara Raja Batteries noted: “We have taken proactive measures to ensure that all our obligations to supply products and services to our customers are met in a timely manner without causing any inconvenience, whatsoever.”

Amara did not reply to BEST’s questions.

Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

Entek expands global lead-acid and lithium battery separator reach with NSG buy-out

Mon, 05/17/2021 - 08:24 -- Paul Crompton
Entek expands global lead-acid and lithium battery separator reach with NSG buy-out

Battery separator firm Entek has signed a deal to acquire the majority stake in Nippon Sheet Glass’ (NSG) lead-acid battery separator business.

The buy-out combines US firm Entek’s core know-how in material science, equipment engineering and design, along with capital, to fund future growth with NSG Group’s leadership and customer focus.

Both companies have executed the relevant agreements and plan to complete the deal in August 2021— subject to laws and regulations in the relevant jurisdictions, including NSG’ home country Japan.

NSG will hold a minority stake in— although actual percentages are not being disclosed— and appoint a director to the board of the battery separator business (BSS).

The new BSS company will own all battery separator manufacturing facilities in Japan and China for both polyethylene (PE) separator and absorbent glass mat (AGM).  

The acquisition gives Entek more than 400 million square metres of aggregate PE separator production capacity (from its sites in the US, UK, Indonesia and Japan) to support its lead-acid battery market.

That figure does not include AGM capacity (Japan and China) or the firm’s lithium separator capacity in the US, the company’s VP of global sales, Clint Beutelschies, told BEST.

The deal was made when NSG decided the best option for the BSS business was for it to be integrated with, and managed by, Entek so that it could “develop further and enhance its value for its customers”.

NSG has supplied battery separators for lead-acid batteries mainly in Asia, including manufacturing footprints in China and a strong market position in Japan.

The firms are joint venture partners in the Entek NSG Separindo PE manufacturing plant in Indonesia, on which they broke ground in 2019.

In 2019, Entek announced plans to double the capacity of the Indonesian plant to 90 million square metres by the close of this year.

 
Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

Lead-acid battery formation firm Inbatec’s new global VP to boost presence in the Americas

Mon, 01/04/2021 - 11:57 -- Paul Crompton

German lead-acid battery formation company Inbatec has appointed Nick Hennen as global vice-president of sales and business development to advance and increase business in North and South America.

Hennen, who will be located in Missouri, US, will focus on expanding the German firm’s reach as well as assisting its sister company Kustan in expanding its sales. 

Hennen has been in the battery industry for more than 25 years, initially as a sales engineer with Bitrode— specialising in non-automotive technologies such as lithium-ion and nickel-metal hydride— and most recently as VP of Americas & global business development sales at Digatron.

Inbatec's managing director, Christian Papmahl, said: “I have known Nick for many years and understand his knowledge of battery production.

“More importantly though, he is well-respected with a large network and has a global understanding of all battery technologies. We are ready to take the next step and coordinate sales and growth on that level.

“We think Nick’s background across all types of battery production and end user applications brings a new perspective to our companies.

“In the short-term, we want to be more in touch with our customers in North America, but looking to a strategy of growing opportunities in India, Southeast Asia and China very quickly. 

“A lot of exciting things are going to happen with both Inbatec and Kustan over the next few years, and Nick will lead many of these efforts.”

Nick went to the University of Missouri and has a degree in Electrical Engineering. Later he achieved an executive level MBA from the Olin School at Washington University, St. Louis. 

Most of his career has been focused on battery formation including lead-acid, lithium and other technologies. He also has been involved in several stationary energy storage projects in the US and South America, primarily for electrical grid usage.

Sign-up to our FREE weekly industry newsletter, to get the weeks news delivered to your inbox every Monday.

Pages

Subscribe to lead-acid