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Corvus nets Norwegian battery storage contract

Thu, 09/14/2017 - 09:55 -- News Editor
Corvus nets Norwegian battery storage contract

Maritime energy storage firm Corvus Energy is to supply its lithium-ion battery storage products to Norwegian maritime electronics firm, Elmarin AS, for three new fishing vessels with battery-based hybrid propulsion.

Canada-based Corvus said the vessels, to be delivered next year, will each be equipped with 250kwh Orca battery systems. The batteries will supply electrical power for propulsion systems and electrical networks.

 

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University and industry alliance to help India meet 2020 EV goals

Fri, 02/03/2017 - 11:45 -- Paul Crompton
University and industry alliance to help India meet 2020 EV goals

A university and semiconductor firm has a forged a partnership to help India meet its target of getting seven million hybrid and electric vehicles on the country’s roads by 2020.

A research laboratory in Puducherry, India, aims to help researchers develop all-solid state thin film lithium, bulk lithium, lithium-sulfur, lithium-air and flow batteries.

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Norwegian Maritime Authority approves two new lithium-ion ESS

Fri, 11/11/2016 - 09:55 -- Xuan Zhong

Two companies have had their lithium-ion energy storage systems  approved for use in a variety of hybrid and fully electric maritime applications in Norway.

Saft, the French firm brought out by utility company Total earlier this year Seanergy® marine lithium-ion Super-Phosphate® (SLFP) ESS has been approved by the Norwegian Maritime Authority (NMA).

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Don’t die… just get bought!

Tue, 05/10/2016 - 12:49 -- Paul Crompton

Now is a great time to sell your battery manufacturing business— to an oil company.

The age of oil isn’t over yet but those in fossil fuels know it’s coming, so now is the time to diversify. Some have been doing it for years— BP for example— an early entrant into solar energy.

So it’s hardly any surprise to see that SAFT, the French battery specialist,  just got snapped up by Total, the multinational but French rooted oil and gas corporation.

It only seems like yesterday that SAFT was trying to wriggle free from Alcatel, the French telecom player, back in the late 90s. The SAFT management were frustrated, merely being just a division in a business which was expanding in all directions— internet, cellular and the term ‘energy storage’ wasn’t really in executive vernacular. It is now.

SAFTs specialist lithium products have proven too costly for the hybrid and EV market but acceptable for the military and aerospace markets.

And while the company had at least one interesting liason with Johnson Controls, it seems to have been a little lack lustre of late— and maybe a little rudderless following the unexpected death of John Searle, its former chairman and highly energetic commercial manager, in 2014.

Maybe there’s a lesson here— that if battery companies are really going to reap the rewards of the energy storage market, they are going to have be part of bigger energy businesses with access to capital and management resources they sorely lack.

If you look east, the big players in batteries, LG Samsung and Panasonic are all part of much larger concerns in the electrical and electronics field.

Small is beautiful up to a point. But if energy storage is really going to change the world it needs to be part of something bigger. That might be one way that lead acid industry gets itself away from the abyss it could be heading for.

New motor could drive market for 48V Pb-A hybrid vehicles

Wed, 11/11/2015 - 15:29 -- Paul Crompton
New motor could drive market for 48V Pb-A hybrid vehicles

A low voltage switched-reluctance motor by Controlled Power Technologies (CPT) could provide an answer for 12-48V mild hybrid using lead-acid solutions is being made widely available to the auto industry. 

The system has the potential to pave the way for a new generation of affordable and cost-effective micro-mild hybrid cars.

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Siemens serves Qatar with Ni-HM hybrid powered LRV

Mon, 03/23/2015 - 11:44 -- Paul Crompton

ONE of the first Siemens Avenio light rail vehicle (LRV) equipped with a nickel-metal hydride hybrid energy storage system is being tested ahead of delivery to Qatar.

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The editor’s take

Mon, 02/02/2015 - 17:17 -- Gerry Woolf

AABC: Lead is far from dead again and nobody else is making money!

There’s a plethora of hybrid, pure electrics and plug in electrics now available from German manufacturers— more than 60 variants but nobody is buying— well not in any serious numbers.

But they’re still buying cars in Europe and a lot of them have stop-start systems in them and the customers don't have a choice on that.

And that, probably, is all you need to know, if you’re thinking about entering the near ‘Kamikazi’ advanced automotive battery market— DON'T!

The reason? You’ll find it hard to get costs down to under US$200/kW by the time you’ve done all your testing and development and built battery pack on your own, which is what the car industry needs.

But strangely enough, when someone has (Elon Musk and Tesla) do the rest of the industry give the man and the company a well deserved pat-on-the-back and an admission of “ maybe you gotta point there” (a battery pack built with  a myriad of 18650 cells works and comes in under budget)? Of course not. This writer thinks battery Guru Anderman alluded to this, slightly but NO, not the German auto industry. No, the build quality of the battery pack was not quite up to German industry build standards— a few spots of dodgy welding here and there, too complicated with so many cells. No not even “it's a good try Elon.”

Very churlish of the Germans, we thought here at BEST.

We feel Robert Goddard, the US pioneer of modern rocketry would have sent Werner Von Braun, the designer of infamous V2 ballistic missile a “well done” in having got the world’s first ballistic missile off the ground! Shame about the purpose though.

Wouldn’t it be really strange if VW and the others actually introduce an electric vehicle in the next two years, buying into Musk’s mega 18650 factory capability?

And that wouldn’t surprise this writer in the least. Because when it comes to battery system development, it seems German production engineering is completely beaten on getting prices down further— unless there’s more standardisation and collaboration— a real German VOLKSWAGEN, if you get my drift. An Audi or BMW on the outside but pretty much the same under the hood. Not good for battery innovation but it might lead to affordable electric cars.

Other Germans were much more encouraging, even toward the ‘ugly duckling’ of lead-acid.

Eckhard Karden, Ford Eurorpe’s battery wizz, had only good things to say about the first generation stop-start technology— lead-acid. And it means it will still be there in the next generation too, well beyond 2025. But it won’t be alone. Quite what lead-acid will be sharing its bed with will be part of this author’s AABC write up in the Spring issue of BEST. To guarantee receiving a copy, click here and subscribe. It’s a tiny fraction of $1500.00! 

Corvus Energy to deliver lithium polymer battery ESS to hybrid ferry

Thu, 11/27/2014 - 16:52 -- Laura Varriale
Corvus Energy

Battery storage maker Corvus Energy has been contracted to supply an energy storage system (ESS) to Norwegian Fjord1’s hybrid ferry Fannefjord.

The ESS comprises of 63 lithium polymer batteries with a capacity of 410kWh.

The ESS will be integrated with the existing Siemens drive system and be powered by two liquefied natural gas (LNG) generators.

According to Corvus Energy, the conversion of the LNG vessel to a battery hybrid will reduce methane slips and deliver further reduced greenhouse gas emissions, fuel efficiency and maintenance costs. The ferry currently features one diesel engine and two LNG-fuelled main engines.

The 123m Fannefjord has a capacity of 390 passengers and 125 cars.

Canadian-based Corvus Energy claimed that the ferry will be the world’s first LNG battery ferry on commercial routes.

The company recently announced that that its ESS has successfully achieved reductions in bunker consumption during a three-month trial at a hybrid passenger ferry operated by Norled/AS in Norway.

“This trial proves the Corvus energy storage product is an effective solution for modernisation of existing vessels, extending their usable lifespan and reducing costs for the operators,” said Sean Puchalski, vice president for business development at Corvus Energy.

 

BEEA selects CPT’s 48V LC Super Hybrid technology as ‘Green Product of the Year’

Wed, 10/15/2014 - 11:36 -- Laura Varriale
48V LC Super Hybrid

Controlled Power Technologies’ (CPT) low voltage hybrid technology has won the ‘Green Product of the Year’ award at the British Engineering Excellence Awards.

The 48V LC Super Hybrid solution is designed to reduce CO2 emissions and can be fitted in various vehicles. The product features a lead-carbon battery and combines electric supercharger as well as motor-generator applications of CPT’s switched-reluctance motor technology.

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